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HBD3810

Navigating the Digital Landscape

The purpose of the course is to initiate and mentor students in their understanding of the uses, purposes, and functions of information in a digital landscape.  It is intended to serve as a primer on information science, research technologies, and analytics creation.  Students will learn about a multi-faceted framework of guidelines and competency standards to fully understand the innate ramifications of information creation, collection, usage, storage/recall, organization, and value.

UPON COMPLETION OF THE COURSE, THE STUDENT WILL BE COMPETENT IN:

  • Describing different types of information authority, such as subject matter expertise (e.g., scholarship), societal position (e.g., public office or title), or special experience (e.g., participating in a historic event);
  • Identifying research tools and indicators of information authority to determine the credibility of sources; and understanding the criteria that might change this credibility;
  • Assessing the fit between an information product’s creation to match a particular information need;
  • Stating the purpose and unique criteria of terms like copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain as they apply to digital information;
  • Applying informed choices about online actions impacting privacy and the commodity of personal information;
  • Differentiating between various research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry;
  • Critically evaluating contributions made by others in information community environments;
  • Confirming that a work of information may not represent the only or even the majority perspective on any given issue;
  • Matching information needs and search strategies to appropriate information search tools;
  • Discussing the increasingly social nature of the information ecosystem where authorities actively connect with one another and sources develop over time;
  • Distinguishing between correct and incorrect ethical and legal applications and uses of information within a society, community, or organization.

Syllabi